News

Future trends

The Lostock Community Partnership (LCP) recognises that trends in community involvement in terms of public meetings has changed. This means that the past ‘one size fits all’ membership meetings will need to be adapted into a diverse range of involvement activities to meet the needs of its varied target audience. However if the LCP is to be successful in developing a stronger community in order to improve the neighbourhood, members of the community must also take ownership and responsibility for where they live and the work of the LCP.

For example, the successes of the Parks sub-group clearly demonstrates that targeting agencies that can address specific issues, in this case TMBC Parks and Country side department, and providing local people with the means to actively participate in their areas of concern and interest is very effective. This group is now working independently from the Partnership but will continue to hold strong ties and working relationships with the Partnership. This shows that the LCP committee members do not have to actively carry out and control all regeneration projects within Lostock but through positive working relationships with local groups and agencies and proactive planning, campaigning, and communication, they can influence change within the neighbourhood. 

The LCP must now consider which other areas of focus and support are needed and how it can best adapt its involvement processes to meet the needs of different sections of the community such as Parents and families; Young people; Community groups etc. However these groups and individuals are unlikely to come to the Partnership of their own accord. The Lostock Partnership must increase its profile and actively recruit individuals and groups to participate in their activities. 

Within the next 10 years local agencies such as Trafford Housing Trust, the Primary Care Trust, Lostock College, and Trafford Metropolitan Borough Council have the potential to radically change the infrastructure of Lostock’s build environment. The Lostock Partnership has an important responsibility to play within this as a voice for local people and a co-ordinating mechanism for guiding the regeneration process.  

However, for the regeneration of Lostock to succeed long term, forward planning in terms of finances and the management of the Lostock Partnership is essential. In the last two years the neighbourhood has initiated change through the successful bid for Fair Share money. However the danger is that once this funding has come to an end the neighbourhood will not be able to sustain the regeneration achieved.